Brandon Salamone

Brandon Salamone

A true triple threat, Salamone soars in both modern and classic musical theatre works and is equally at home on stage and screen. A recent graduate of The New School on Broadway, a division of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, with a BFA in Musical Theatre, Salamone played a range of roles in mainstage productions, including: Woof, a gentle, curious, sensual member of the tribe in the 60’s rock musical Hair; conservative, conflicted, insecure teen in the stage adaptation of the John Waters film, Cry Baby; Old Man Strong in Urinetown, gentle father to protagonist Bobby Strong with an unjust, tragic fate, and developed the new musical Medusa,  where he graciously undertook the dark energetic score of hip hop and rock in a modern adaptation of the Greek myth.

Artist Bio

A true triple threat, Salamone soars in both modern and classic musical theatre works and is equally at home on stage and screen.

A recent graduate of The New School on Broadway, a division of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, with a BFA in Musical Theatre, Salamone played a range of roles in mainstage productions, including: Woof, a gentle, curious, sensual member of the tribe in the 60’s rock musical Hair; conservative, conflicted, insecure teen in the stage adaptation of the John Waters film, Cry Baby; Old Man Strong in Urinetown, gentle father to protagonist Bobby Strong with an unjust, tragic fate, and developed the new musical Medusa,  where he graciously undertook the dark energetic score of hip hop and rock in a modern adaptation of the Greek myth.

At Westchester Broadway Theatre, Salamone displayed versatility and charm as George in Schoolhouse Rock, singing beloved tunes like “Three is a Magic Number” and “Just a Bill”. Salamone also danced his way through Footloose, with raw, youthful excitement. 

At Spotlight Arts Inc, Salamone sparkled as the teen heartthrob Link Larkin in Hairspray. He enlivened the music and choreography with his clear, soaring voice and energetic, articulate dancing.  In Beauty and the Beast, he crafted the Beast’s transformation from an embittered lonely figure to a gentle, loving man. In Grease, Salamone brought a unique depth to the greaser Danny Zuko, as he balanced the lighthearted tone of the nostalgic show and Danny’s too-cool-for-school swagger with genuine character development and vulnerability.

Salamone also thrives in morally ambiguous and outright villainous roles: He played the insufferable, petty, insecure Lord Farquaad in Shrek at the Brewster Theatre Wing to uproarious effect and crafted an alluring and mysterious Cat in Seussical: The Musical, juggling the shifting duties and perspectives of the all-knowing, slick, mischievous master of ceremonies. 

Although Salamone has a solid base in musical theatre, he ably takes on challenging roles in stage plays, both classic and modern. In Macbeth at the Brewster Theatre Wing, he played Malcolm, the eldest son of the slain King Duncan and ultimate victor over Macbeth. Salamone gave a dynamic performance, with thoughtful character development and a studied, authoritative handle on the text. In the iconic American play Our Town, Salamone played the notoriously challenging role of Simon Stimson, and brought curiosity and tenderness to the alcoholic choir director, the one apparent blemish on the idyllic Grover’s Corners.

On screen, Salamone makes appearances in major feature films and television shows including Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, The Deuce, and Lipstick Jungle.