Cree Carrico

Cree Carrico

Soprano Cree Carrico is “a notably versatile performer” and “sensational actress” who is continuously praised by critics for her “crystal clarity at the center of every note” making it “hard to watch anyone else when she’s on stage.” As a lead interpreter of 20th and 21st century works, Carrico collaborates closely with a number of composers and librettists and performs in many premières of contemporary pieces, including the New York première of Jake Heggie’s monodrama At the Statue of Venus.  Since then, Carrico has sang Lisa in Little and Vavrek’s Dog Days at the Opera America New Works Forum and has also performed on Royce Vavrek and Lauren Worsham’s 21st century downtown salon, The Coterie. Additionally, during BAM’s Next Wave Festival, Cree appeared on both nights of Beth Morrison’s 21c Liederabend, op. 3, singing Julian Wachner’s Come My Dark Eyed One, and sang the world première of Marie Incontrera and Royce Vavrek’s Albert, Bound or Unbound. 

In the current season, Ms. Carrico will premiere a new work, “Sleeping and Waking” by composer Blake Allen, as well as sing in concert as Cunegonde in Candide with Rapides Symphony Orchestra. Last season, Cree performed Solana in Portland Opera’s production of Leslie Uyeda’s When the Sun Comes Out, returned to Opera Tampa as Mabel in Pirates of Penzance, performed in The Song Catcher at Lyric Fest, Ginerva in Being Ariodante with Teatro Theatre at the Italian Academy of Columbia University, appeared as a soloist with the Missoula Symphony Orchestra’s Black Tie Broadway, and was the main event in the Finger Lakes Opera July 2022 cabaret, “An Evening with Cree”.

 

Calendar

Event Date
Jun 4
to
Jun 5
Soloist
Black Tie Broadway
Missoula Symphony Orchestra
Missoula, MT
Event Date
Jul 30
An Evening with Cree
Herself
Finger Lakes Opera
Canandaigua, NY
Event Date
Sep 3
Candide
Cunegonde
Rapides Symphony Orchestra
Alexandria, LA
Event Date
Nov 8
"Sleeping and Waking" by Blake Allen
Soloist
Carnegie Hall
New York, New York

Artist Bio

Soprano Cree Carrico is “a notably versatile performer” and “sensational actress” who is continuously praised by critics for her “crystal clarity at the center of every note” making it “hard to watch anyone else when she’s on stage.” As a lead interpreter of 20th and 21st century works, Carrico collaborates closely with a number of composers and librettists and performs in many premières of contemporary pieces, including the New York première of Jake Heggie’s monodrama At the Statue of Venus.  Since then, Carrico has sang Lisa in Little and Vavrek’s Dog Days at the Opera America New Works Forum and has also performed on Royce Vavrek and Lauren Worsham’s 21st century downtown salon, The Coterie. Additionally, during BAM’s Next Wave Festival, Cree appeared on both nights of Beth Morrison’s 21c Liederabend, op. 3, singing Julian Wachner’s Come My Dark Eyed One, and sang the world première of Marie Incontrera and Royce Vavrek’s Albert, Bound or Unbound. 

In the current season, Ms. Carrico will premiere a new work, “Sleeping and Waking” by composer Blake Allen, as well as sing in concert as Cunegonde in Candide with Rapides Symphony Orchestra. Last season, Cree performed Solana in Portland Opera’s production of Leslie Uyeda’s When the Sun Comes Out, returned to Opera Tampa as Mabel in Pirates of Penzance, performed in The Song Catcher at Lyric Fest, Ginerva in Being Ariodante with Teatro Theatre at the Italian Academy of Columbia University, appeared as a soloist with the Missoula Symphony Orchestra’s Black Tie Broadway, and was the main event in the Finger Lakes Opera July 2022 cabaret, “An Evening with Cree”.

Recently, Carrico performed as Anna in Tintypes with Artistree’s Music Theater Festival, Younger Alyce in Glory Denied with Urban Arias at the Keegan Theater in DC and at Kentucky Opera, the soprano soloist in Paterson’s Cocoa Cantata and Bach’s Coffee Cantata for the Mostly Modern Festival as well as Cunegonde in a filmed production of Candide for the Opera Company of Middlebury.  She has created the roles of Zegner Daughter, Littler in the world première of Missy Mazzoli and Royce Vavrek’s Proving Up with Opera Omaha and subsequently at The Miller Theater in New York, and made her Fort Worth Opera début as Rosemary Kennedy in the world première of David T. Little and Royce Vavrek’s JFK, with subsequent performances with Montreal Opera.

Previous engagements include the role of Beatrice in Three Decembers with Nashville Opera and Opera Memphis, Adele in Die Fledermaus with Opera Tampa, La Fee in Cendrillon and Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire with Opera Company of Middlebury, Musetta in La bohème with Union Avenue Opera, Morning Star with On Site Opera, Younger Alyce in Memphis Opera’s production of Glory Denied, and My Fair Lady: in Concert with the Utah Symphony. Additional operatic engagements include Gilda in Rigoletto with Syracuse Opera, Adele in Die Fledermaus with Finger Lakes Opera, Diana in Orpheus in the Underworld with New Orleans Opera, Amour in Orphée et Eurydice and Sagredo/Eos in Galileo Galilei with Des Moines Metro Opera.

In concert, Carrico recently performed Carmina Burana with Trinity Wall Street, a recital with Boonville Missouri River Festival, in Manhattan School of Music’s Centennial Celebrations Recital Series, as a soloist in Stray Bird with the New Chamber Ballet, in a concert celebrating The Muny’s 100th season with St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Women in Opera’s Backstage Brunch with Opera America, and in American Lyric Theater’s workshop of Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Fallen Giant.   

A member of Actor’s Equity, Cree earned her union card as an ensemble member in the New York Philharmonic’s performance of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel, sharing the stage with Nathan Gunn, Kelli O’Hara, and Stephanie Blythe. She was also seen in Carnegie Hall’s one-night-only performance of Guys & Dolls, starring Nathan Lane and Megan Mullally. Previous musical theatre roles include both Fraulein Kost and Fraulein Schneider in Cabaret, Celeste I/Harriett in Sunday in the Park with George, and the ensembles of Ragtime and Jesus Christ Superstar. During her final semester at Oberlin, Cree played Comrade Charlotte in Flora, the Red Menace, working closely with the legendary John Kander on a new version of the musical.

Carrico added the demanding title role in Douglas Moore’s The Ballad of Baby Doe, in her performance with Chautauqua Opera, to her growing repertoire of 20th and 21st centuries leading ladies. She made her New York début as Marie Antoinette in Corigliano’s The Ghosts of Versailles while earning her Master’s degree at Manhattan School of Music. For her performance as the anti-heroine Jenny Smith in Weill’s Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny, The New York Times extolled her “wounded smoothness.”

Unphased by the intimacy of solo performance, Cree created The Ophelia Project, a daring and ever-evolving program of songs, arias and monologues that bends the boundaries of a traditional recital to explore the psychology of Shakespeare’s tragic heroine. The Ophelia Project was chosen to inaugurate Opera America’s Emerging Artist Recital Series at the National Opera Center in October 2013.

In addition to her contemporary repertoire, Cree performed the soprano solos in Messiah with New Mexico Philharmonic, Dvorak’s Stabat Mater with The Brearley Singers at Alice Tully Hall, and Orff’s Carmina Burana with Great Lakes Symphony Orchestra. Additional roles include Haydn’s Mariazeller Messe for Mid-America Productions at Carnegie Hall and the title role of Evangeline in Concert with Longfellow Chorus.

Cree received a Bachelor’s of Music from the Oberlin Conservatory and a Master’s of Music from Manhattan School of Music. She was a finalist in the Ades Competition, the Lotte Lenya Competition and the Houston Grand Opera Studio.

Updated August 28, 2022

Video

Cree Carico as Cunegonde in Candide

Michael Djupstrom’s “Sejdefu majka bedase”

Green Finch & Linnet Birds from Sweeney Todd

Cocoa Contata (World Premiere)

“Number 1” of Six Sandburg Songs, music by Andrew Gerle, text by Carl Sandburg (world premiere)

“Quando m’en vo” from La boheme

“Juliette’s Waltz” from  Romeo et Juliette

Press

"...brilliantly revealed Stella’s mixed and troubled emotions...” – Rutland Herald

A Streetcar Named Desire – “Soprano Cree Carrico brilliantly revealed Stella’s mixed and troubled emotions.”

"...her crystal-clear soprano-belt mix... – Opera News

The Difficulty of Crossing a Field – “Carrico, a notably versatile performer, plays up the humor in her part with a girlish impetuosity that spills naturally from her crystal-clear soprano-belt mix.”

"...hard to watch anyone else when she’s on stage..." – New York Classical Review

Morning Star – “Cree Carrico, meanwhile, brought a bright soprano and wide, winging phrases as Esther. She is, moreover, a sensational actress; there is an irrepressible brightness in her spirit, and it’s almost hard to watch anyone else when she’s on stage. Even in her reactions to other characters, she hints at a rich inner life with just the flitting of her eyes, or the quick bite of a nail.”

"...produced a voice which was vibrant and powerful..." – Jamestown Post Journal

Ballad of Baby Doe – “Lovely Cree Carrico, in the title role, is slender and small in stature, yet she produced a voice which was vibrant and powerful in its middle register, and which soared to a crystalline top, solid in sound, yet tempting us to expect an extremely high note, then seemingly effortlessly, rising even higher. Brava, diva!”

"...commanded the stage with her studied affectlessness...” – Opera News

The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahoganny – “Carrico, who had a gleaming, focused ping to her tone and a Louise Brooks haircut, commanded the stage with her studied affectlessness.”

"...Carrico's Cunegonde is more determined... well up to the vocal pyrotechnics..." – Opera News

Candide – “Cree Carrico’s Cunegonde is a steelier, more determined creature and thus a perfect counterpoint to Bernegger’s Candide. She is well up to the vocal pyrotechnics of “Glitter and Be Gay,” vaulting to an interpolated high F in one run. Carrico makes the number a sincere attempt to pull herself out of despair, and the comic bits—an intransigent clasp, actually trying to dry her tears with a bracelet as the lyric suggests—are natural and earned.”