Andrew Manea

Andrew Manea

Lauded for his “Charming…robust baritone…” rising Romanian-American baritone Andrew Manea recently made his role debut as the Duke of Nottingham in Roberto Devereux with the San Francisco Opera. These performances “thrust him into the spotlight, solidifying his status as the next leading baritone of his generation…” (Opera Wire).

Mr. Manea has since made both his house and role debut with Palm Beach Opera as Figaro in Il barbiere di Siviglia, and was scheduled to join the roster of Lyric Opera of Chicago for Der Ring des Niebelungen (COVID-19 cancellation). In the current season he debuts with Arizona Opera as Escamillo in Carmen and Opera Omaha as Lorenzo in I Capuleti e i Montecchi, and returns to Palm Beach Opera as Danilo in The Merry Widow.

Calendar

Event Date
Jan 28
to
Feb 6
Carmen
Escamillo
Arizona Opera
Phoenix, Arizona
Event Date
Mar 25
to
Mar 27
The Merry Widow
Danilo
Palm Beach Opera
Palm Beach, FL

Artist Bio

Lauded for his “Charming…robust baritone…” rising Romanian-American baritone Andrew Manea recently made his role debut as the Duke of Nottingham in Roberto Devereux with the San Francisco Opera. These performances “thrust him into the spotlight, solidifying his status as the next leading baritone of his generation…” (Opera Wire).

Mr. Manea has since made both his house and role debut with Palm Beach Opera as Figaro in Il barbiere di Siviglia, and was scheduled to join the roster of Lyric Opera of Chicago for Der Ring des Niebelungen (COVID-19 cancellation). In the current season he debuts with Arizona Opera as Escamillo in Carmen and Opera Omaha as Lorenzo in I Capuleti e i Montecchi, and returns to Palm Beach Opera as Danilo in The Merry Widow.

Mr. Manea is heard frequently at the San Francisco Opera, making his mainstage debut as an Adler Fellow in the role of Marullo in Rigoletto, and during his tenure also performing the Huntsman/Gamekeeper in Rusalka, Sciarrone in Tosca, the Marchese d’Obigny in La traviata, and in the world premiere of John Adams’ Girls of the Golden West.

Highlights of recent seasons include Marcello in La bohème with Shreveport Opera, #7 in Transformations with the Merola Opera Program, and Escamillo in Carmen in Wuhan, China. With the College-Conservatory of Music at Cincinnati University, he has sung the Danilo in The Merry Widow, the Father in Hansel and Gretel and the Forester in The Cunning Little Vixen. On the concert stage, he made his Schwabacher Recital debut with esteemed pianist Warren Jones.

Andrew Manea was awarded First Place and Audience Favorite in the Mary Jacobs Smith Singer of the Year Competition with Shreveport Opera, was a Semifinalist of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions, earned Second Place and Audience Favorite in the Opera Columbus Cooper-Bing International Vocal Competition, was a Finalist in the Jensen Foundation Vocal Competition, and was a Career Grant recipient in the Giulio Gari Foundation Competition.

A native of Troy, Michigan, Mr. Manea holds his Bachelor’s degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music and his Master’s degree from the University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music, where he studied with the prolific Bill McGraw.

Updated 5.3.21

Press

"...ample vibrance of sound and high notes..." – Palm Beach Daily News

Il barbiere di Siviglia, Palm Beach Opera – “The opera’s hit tune, of course, is Figaro’s entrance aria, and Andrew Manea properly took focus from his very first lines: “Largo al factotum.” The Romanian-American baritone has personal presence, enhanced by ample vibrance of sound and high notes — ringing Gs and As — to burn. As Friday’s performance progressed, Manea dominated the action, as he interacted physically and blended vocally with his colleagues on stage…This Figaro was equally adept in his fluid delivery of the opera’s abundant recitatives (speech-like musical dialogue), inventively punctuated by [the] harpsichordist.”

"...next leading baritone of his generation..." – Opera Wire

Roberto Devereux, San Francisco Opera – “…the role of Nottingham…thrust him into the spotlight and solidify his status as the next leading baritone of his generation…”